yuvi

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maryada ramanna

working stills

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Orage

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Chiranjeevi Rare Photo

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Saftey First

A safest Ad of furniture
Saftey First
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Outsourcing

Outsourcing has been a boon for Indian economy but it did create some trouble for US products. Here's an example..
Outsourcing
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Total Privacy Laptop

its a very very personnel laptop.
Total Privacy Laptop
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Reflection of reality

Don't believe in the rare views.
Reflection of reality
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servive pack 3

Waiting for the next version? have a featured look
servive pack 3
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VIP cinema seats

Waiting for inaugural function,
VIP cinema seats
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Bad Parking

wanna learn how to park, watch this
Bad Parking
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CD burning

There is no nuro in my system so i'm using this technique to burn,
CD burning
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Need Programmers

Need a job call to the number
Need Programmers
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Print screen?????????

Print screen?????????
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Smart Advertisement

Nothing is impossible
Smart Advertisement
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Life Cycle of an IT employee

This picture reflects the time table of an IT employee.
Life Cycle of an IT employee
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Water on mars

Man discovered the water on mars.
Water on mars
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Not going anywhere for a while

New technique to hire
Not going anywhere for a 
while
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Cup humor

Don't waste a drop of tea, i"m there to catch
Cup humor
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Are Computers Male Or Female?

As you are aware, ships have long been characterized as being female (e.g., "Steady as she goes" or "She's listing to starboard, Captain!")

Recently, a group of computer scientists (all males) announced that computers should also be referred to as being female.
Their reasons for drawing this conclusion follow:

Five reasons to believe computers are female:

1. No one but the Creator understands their internal logic.
2. The native language they use to communicate with other computers is incomprehensible to everyone else.
3. The message "Bad command or file name" is about as informative as, "If you don't know why I'm mad at you, then I'm certainly not going to tell you."
4. Even your smallest mistakes are stored in long-term memory for later retrieval.
5. As soon as you make a commitment to one, you find yourself spending half your paycheck on accessories for it.

However, another group of computer scientists, (all female) think that computers should be referred to as if they were male. Their reasons follow:

Five reasons to believe computers are male:

1. They have a lot of data, but are still clueless.
2. They are supposed to help you solve problems, but half the time they ARE the problem.
3. As soon as you commit to one you realize that, if you had waited a little longer, you could have obtained a better model.
4. In order to get their attention, you have to turn them on.
5. Big power surges knock them out for the rest of the night.
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Topless Model

Topless Model: Wearing un-buttoned lee cooper jeans
Topless Model
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Result of Love Marriage!!!

It's ALWAYS the kids that suffer the mistakes of their Parents!!


This kid was Named "Zonkey"!!!
Result of Love Marriage!!!
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More stress and pressure at creative jobs: Study

Bangalore: A research done at the University of Toronto revealed that the demands related to creative jobs can create excessive job pressures for workers. The data sample included more than 1200 American workers.

The national level survey was carried out by Scott Schieman, sociology professor at University of Toronto and his co-author Marisa Young. The participants were asked questions like: "How often do you have the chance to learn new things?"; "How often do you have the chance to solve problems?"; "How often does your job allow you to develop your skills or abilities?" and "How often does your job require you to be creative?"



A "creative work activities" index was created based on the responses from the participants of the study. It was found that people who score higher on the creative work index are more likely to experience excessive job pressures, feel overwhelmed by their workloads, and more frequently receive work-related contact (emails, texts, calls) outside of normal work hours.

Also the people who engage in job related pressures are mostly expected to involve in "work-family multitasking"-that is, they try to juggle job- and home-related tasks at the same time while they are at home.

All this accumulated lead to more conflict between work and family roles-a central cause of problems for functioning in the family/household domain.

According to Schieman, "these stressful elements of creative work detract from what most people generally see as the positive sides of creative job conditions. And, these processes reveal the unexpected ways that the work life can cause stress in our lives-stress that is typically associated with higher status job conditions and can sometimes blur the boundaries between work and non-work life."

The study that appears in the Spring 2010 issue of the journal Social Science Research also revealed that people who score higher on the creative work index are more likely to think about their work outside of normal work hours. However many said they did not feel stressed out when these thoughts occurred.

Schieman added, "There are aspects of creative work that many people enjoy thinking about because they add a sense of accomplishment and fulfillment to our lives. This is quite different from the stressful thoughts about work that keep some of us awake at night: the deadlines you can't control, someone else's incompetent work that you need to handle first thing in the morning, or routine work that lacks challenge or feels like a grind."
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Productive or looking-busy at work?

Bangalore: People, working in a company, can be of two kinds; ones who are productive, produce results, their performance adds value to the overall scheme of things and the others look busy, but are not really productive, writes Priya Kumar of the Economic Times.

There are certain attributes that define both the categories. According to Kumar, the productive workers always have a plan for the day and they get people to work and are great taskmasters. Whenever they are dealing with a customer, subordinate or senior, they mean business. On the other hand, the looking-busy workers have no plan for their own. They spend their time tending to work that comes their way and are a target for the taskmasters to run chores for them.



Apart from having their own plan, the productive workers work the plan. They are creative, responsible and accountable. As they take responsibility and own up the results, no matter good or bad, they instinctively rise to leadership. But the looking-busy workers wait for instructions. They don't take decisions themselves and bank on others to make decisions for them. Distractive by nature, these workers always need to be pushed and motivated to get on track with their work.

The productive workers are able to deliver results. They are not afraid of making mistakes, instead they learn from their mistakes. They are optimistic in their attitude, not being afraid of unexpected results.
Unlike the productive workers, the looking busy workers think that delivering results is a frightful task. Although they can deliver daily tasks, results span over a period of time and they cannot keep vision of that. Because of low self esteem and lessening faith in their abilities, success is an alien thought to the looking busy workers.

For a rising career graph, one has to produce results. Many people would like to believe themselves as productive, but it is only a comparative analysis that can give a clearer picture. Risks have to be taken and challenges have to be faced.
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laxmi

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shilpa's cam

guest mirza

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